A Well Shielded Cable is a Lousy Antenna (and a Good Cable!)

Misinformation and confusion still persists among audiophiles regarding the benefits of cables. Numerous product briefs and postings explain why cables make an audio system sound better ...deliver more definition, better highs, better lows, etc. For many the evidence is clear: upgrade a cable and since the sound improves it must be something inherent to the cable making the difference. The cable must be acting like a tone control/DSP, or enabling the flow of electrons or cleaning the power. The claims are that it's the metallurgy, the gauge, the number of strands, the cryo-treatment, etc.

Alas, no. It's a tough pill to swallow for the spellbound audiophile but the existing memes have deluded many to the real issue. Fact is that cables improve the sound when they act only as conductors and not as antennae. Specifically, cables tethered to a DAC or connected equipment, will transmit and receive RF noise with sufficient energy to perturb the DACs output circuits. To stop this problem, you can play a subjective match game with cables of different levels of RF emissions shielding so that their combined spectrum is low at the DACs important frequencies. Or you can address this issue with a pragmatic endgame goal to eliminate RF noise with extreme shielding on all cables.

Audiowise introduced the RF-STOP Cable Sleeve initially for AC power cords but they are applicable to all other audio cables (interconnects, speaker, DC power). By applying multiple layers of Copper-Silver-Nickel coated fabric in a loosely fitted sleeve over a cable, the combined air-dielectric and 90dB attenuation produces a more effective RF shield than the most expensive audiophile cable (in my subjective testing). A customers' existing cable can be maintained and its RF shielding enhanced with the RF-STOP Cable Sleeve. I have such confidence in its performance that it comes with a satisfaction guarantee ...and a 10% discount if you purchase three or more sleeves.